Could Cannabidiol be Effective for Seizures?

Reem Gebrekidan, Mercer University College of Pharmacy

Dravet Syndrome is a genetic epileptic encephalopathy beginning in infancy that might be characterized by febrile, prolonged, and lateralized seizures.[1] Epilepsy guidelines consider sodium valproate or topiramate as first-line treatment in children with Dravet syndrome while clobazam or stiripentol are supported as adjunctive therapy. Medications such as carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, pregabalin, tiagabine or vigabatrin were advised to be avoided. [2]
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two synthetic cannabinoids based on a substance present in marijuana and a substance acting similarly to another compound in marijuana. Attempting to use components of marijuana is considered to be in the public’s best interest; however, safe and effective use has not been determined. [3] Continue reading

Remove Research Restrictions Before Legalizing Marijuana

Kayla Nguyen, Mercer University College of Pharmacy Class of 2017

The legalized marijuana debate has spread like wildfire across the nation. 23 states and Washington D.C. have all proposed and legalized some form of marijuana usage and possession[i]; however, marijuana is still a Schedule I and federally illegal drug. One of the most common misconceptions about marijuana is the safety and efficacy of smoking.

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